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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S

Monday, December 11, 2017

DIY ICE BOTTLE COOLER!

This comes form www.celebrationsathomeblog.com .  A cool idea to add a little decor to that holiday buffet and to add some color to your holiday table.










 


This icey bottle cooler as seen on my Holiday Bar Design, is a stylish way to present vodka or white wine on the bar while keeping it cold at the same time. It’s a simple project but you need to give yourself a couple of days to freeze the layers. This works well for vodka because it can go in the freezer without turning solid, and is best served very cold anyway. Here’s how it works…

 
 
 



What you’ll need:
  • A 3-liter empty soda container that you will cut the top off of
  • distilled water for more clarity in your end result
  • fruit such as lemons, limes, star fruit, or cranberries
  • duct tape – only in case your bottle floats up in the water
Place the bottle of vodka inside the 3-liter container and fill with an inch or two of the distilled water – freeze until solid.
When the base is frozen you can begin adding slice fruit or berries around the bottle and fill with more water to just cover the fruit layer - freeze until solid.
Once the first fruit layer is frozen you can add your next layer in the same manner, filling with distilled water enough to cover the fruit. This layer should take you to the top of the vodka bottle – freeze until solid.
Once the cooler is frozen, take it out of the freezer so it can thaw slightly – enough to work the 3-liter container off of the ice (about 30 minutes). You may still need to dip in luke warm water to help ease it off. Once you have the ice cooler out of the container store it in the freezer until ready to set on your bar.
Important Tips:
When setting the ice cooler out on your bar, set it in a shallow dish or tray that is lined with a small towel. This will prevent the icey base from slipping around on the dish, as well as help contain the melting ice. Under normal home temperatures this should last a few hours.
If you would like to use the ice cooler for white wine or other cold drink, just insert an empty bottle (wine bottle or other decorative bottle) into the 3-liter container and follow the same steps. You can add your beverage to the empty bottle inside (using a funnel) after the cooler is frozen.

SNOWFLAKE SUGAR COOKIES!

This comes from www.bakersroyale.com.  These look so good you don't even want to eat them. But, if we have to snack on them, what's the harm.  Go ahead and make a batch or two.


Snowflake Sugar Cookies – Dress up your holiday cookie tray with some fun and colorful snowflake sugar cookies.





Snowflake Sugar Cookie





Snowflake Sugar Cookie
I don’t make sugar cookies often, in fact I usually only make them for certain holidays and sometimes for birthday requests. I love the beauty and creativity of them, but they are massively labor intensive and I’m not the most patient person for baking projects like this.
But to save myself a step, I skipped flooding the cookies for the simple design you see in the picture. The royal icing I used is from here. It’s easy to work with and has the perfect consistency for simple lines like the one you see on these snowflake cookies.






Snowflake Sugar Cookies Bakers Royale2 Snowflake Sugar Cookies




 
The cookie recipe is one I have been working with and fine tuning over the years. Actually, the recipe started with me trying to re-create those soft pillow-y sugar cookies from the Ralphs grocery store. You know the ones that are super thick and covered in frosting. I don’t usually like grocery store made cookies but these are awesome, well minus the too-sweet frosting that I always scrape away. But I love the texture of the cookie portion, it’s soft and almost cake-like in texture. I still haven’t figured out how to replicate them, so if anyone has some suggestions or a recipe for it, please help a baker out and give me some tips.

A few notes:
  • The dough will be wet and sticky once mixed, so it requires some chilling before working with it.
  • Divide the dough and create four round flat discs for easy handling. Cover each disc in plastic wrap and refrigerate for up to three days or freeze up to 3 months.
  • To keep the cookies nice and even in thickness, I use these rings on my rolling pin.
  • Lastly, for the curious, using the cream cheese versus all butter gives the cookie a softer texture; and using powdered sugar versus all granulated sugar, also helps to keep the cookie soft and tender while giving it a tighter crumb and a less crisp texture.

Basic Sugar Cookie

Preparation: Heat oven to 350 degrees F. Line bake sheet with parchment paper.
  • 3 cups of flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup cream cheese, softened
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup powdered sugar, sifted
  • 2 eggs, plus1 egg yolk
  • 1 teaspoon of vanilla
Instructions:

1. In a bowl, whisk flour, baking powder and salt; set aside. Cream butter, cream cheese, sugar and powdered sugar until light and fluffy. In a separate bowl lightly mix eggs and vanilla together. With the mixer running on medium low, slowly add egg mixture to creamed butter mixture, continue mixing until combined. Turn off mixer, using a wooden spoon or a sturdy spatula gradually fold dry mixture into wet mixture and continue to fold until combined.

2. Divide the dough into four flat disc and refrigerate for at least 3 hours. Remove chilled dough one disc at a time and roll on a lightly floured surface into 1/4 inch thickness. Cut into desired shapes. Bake cookies for about 8-10 minutes.

CHRISTMAS IN BELGIUM!




   In Belgium there are two main languages, Flemish and Walloon (a version of French) and the two languages are spoken in different regions.
   In Flemish Happy/Merry Christmas is 'Vrolijk Kerstfeest' and in Walloon 'djoyeus Noyé'. 
   On Christmas Eve ('Kerstavond' in Flemish and 'le réveillion de Noël' in Walloon), a special meal is eaten by most families. It starts with a drink (apéritif) and 'nibbles', followed by a 'starter' course such as sea-food, and then stuffed turkey. The dessert is 'Kerststronk' (Flemish) or 'la bûche de Noël' (Walloon) a chocolate Christmas Log made of sponge roll layered with cream. The outside is covered with chocolate butter cream and made to resemble a bark-covered log.








   As in Holland, children in Belgium have two Christmas visitors! On December 6th, St. Nicholas' Day, 'Sinterklaas/St. Niklaas' (Flemish) or 'Saint Nicholas' (Walloon) is believed to bring presents to children. This is quite a long time before Christmas. Different regions of Belgium have different customs and traditions about St. Nicholas. On Christmas day (25th), Santa Claus might bring some more presents if you're really lucky!
   Small family Christmas presents are also given at Christmas too, under the tree, or in stockings near the fire-place, to be found in the morning or opened on Christmas Eve.
The traditional Christmas breakfast is the same as the normal Sunday breakfast eaten throughout the year. This is freshly baked crusty rolls (bakeries do their best trade on









   Sundays in the Flanders region) with butter & cold meats and/or jam, followed by pastries (like Danish pastries) called "koffiekoek(en)" (meaning coffee cake(s) as they are normal eaten with a cup of coffee!). In Walloon districts (the south of Belgium), a special sweet bread called 'cougnou' or 'cougnolle' made in a shape that is supposed to be like baby Jesus is eaten for Christmas breakfast.
   Some families have Advent Crowns made from fir or leylandii greenery.

DIY SANTA CLAUS TIN CAN!

This comes from www.sewmanyways.blogspot.com.


Hello and welcome to Tool Time Tuesday. For the next few weeks or more, I am going to gear these TTT posts towards Christmas...maybe do some decorating posts or maybe gift giving ideas. I know it may seem early, but we all know those nights of making or decorating at the last minute. So why don't you join me in doing one or two crafts a week, so you can actually enjoy the holidays without all the rushing around.

Here is the first project for the holidays....A Santa Can. Make one this week for yourself and then make another one for gift giving. It's perfect and practically FREE!










   Do you remember the post I did showing flower arrangements for a school fundraiser. I went to local restaurants and pizza places and asked them for their large metal cans that tomatoes come in. They were happy to give them to me for free. They are the big ones...7 inches high and 6 inches across at the top.(note: Lowes or Home Depot have unused paint cans of different sizes you could probably use also)

  That's one in the picture below. You will also need red spray paint, something to make a black belt and a belt buckle. Pictures on this next...












Here are some ideas for Santa's black belt. Old leather belts that don't fit any more (I don't want to talk about the not fitting part) or elastic belts that you can adjust to fit.












How about an old strap from a camera or bag that you aren't using any more.












You can also cut black fabric and fold the raw edges into the middle...no sewing! You can also use trim, satin ribbon or ric rac too.






 
 
 

If you aren't using an actual belt, you'll need a buckle. You can cut one off an old belt or use 2 D rings. D rings are the things you find on a belt most of the time made with ribbon or a scarf. Another idea to make a shiny belt buckle is to cut open a soda can, trace a template of a buckle on the inside metal and cut it out with tin snips. Actually, the can is so soft, I cut it with a small pair of scissors.





 
 
 

Just find a picture of a buckle and draw it out on card board.





 
 
 

Then trace it on the inside of the can.





 
 
 

The next step is to spray the can. I sprayed it upside down so the paint won't get inside the can.









Now for the ideas...
a place to hold all the Christmas cards you receive over the holidays.

Add some evergreens cut fresh from outside for the scent of the holidays.




Add some berries for a beautiful centerpiece. These were some fake berries I already had, but real ones from your yard would be beautiful too.


 






Then add a little HO HO HO sign for the perfect greeting at your front door. I bought this sign after Christmas for 10 cents. You can easily make one by printing the words out on your computer, tracing it on cardboard...a little paint and glitter and you're done!





These large cans would be great for centerpieces, but wouldn't a little vegetable can or those tiny tomato paste cans be cute decorated the same way, but used for place card holders at the dinner table. Ohh, I need to make one of those!! I'll show you if I do! Add that to the list of "To Do's"










Here's a little break down of the cost:
  • cans...free
  • belt...free (because it doesn't fit...wahhh!)
  • evergreen...free
  • berries...I had them, but maybe $2.00 if you had to buy a bunch)
  • Ho Ho Ho...10 cents or free if you make one
  • red spray paint...I had it, but $3.00 for the can if you need to buy it
 

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

CHRISTMAS IN DENMARK!





   In Denmark, the Christmas celebrations begin with Advent. In each Sunday in Advent, each one of the four candles are lit on the Advent wreath, that is traditionally made here out of fine spruce twigs and cuttings. On each Sunday in Advent, guests are invited to join in the lighting of the candles on the Advent crown. Drinks are kept for all, though alcoholic beverages are strictly for adults who usually have a warming mixture of red wine, spices and raisins. Kids may drink the juice of some sweet fruit, such as strawberry. Also kept are small cakes of batter usually baked in special pans, and dusted with icing sugar. This is something that everybody loves to have.
   In the weeks leading to the Christmas Eve, Danish families set up Christmas trees in their homes and decorate them in the most beautiful manner. The trees, commonly spruce, are usually decorated with a silver or gold star on the top (never an angel), national flags, cornets with fruit, candies or cookies, small toy music instruments, tin foil strips and the like. Children help their parents in decorating the Christmas tree and also the interiors.







 

   Here, the main Christmas celebration is on December 24(Christmas Eve). But the festive atmosphere is quite apparent even on the day before, i.e 23rd December. In Denmark, this day is popularly called "Lille Juleaften" (Little Christmas Eve) and is a time for family get-togethers and meeting with friends. In Denmark, children believe that their presents are brought by the 'Julemanden' (which means 'Christmas Man'). He looks very similar to Santa Claus and also travels with a sleigh and reindeer. He lives in Greenland, likes rice pudding and is helped by 'nisser' which are like elves.
                Adults relish a cup of hot glögg (hot wine boiled with raisins, nuts and spices) while children munch on “æbleskiver” (a special kind of doughnut with icing sugar, jam or maple syrup). The "Lille Juleaften" menu typically includes the delicious “risengrod” (rice boiled with milk and cinnamon) and “hvidtol” (malt beer). Gifts are often exchanged on this day.







 

On Christmas Eve, the get-togethers continue and so does the feasting. Cookies and hot chocolate are lapped up by kids while adults pour glogg down their throats. One of the main attractions of Christmas Eve is the lighting of the Christmas tree. The Christmas Eve dinner traditionally includes such dishes as
roast pork, roast duck or roast goose with potatoes, red cabbage and gravy. Dessert is usually rice pudding served with a cherry sauce. Traditionally, an almond is hidden inside the dessert which one has to find to recieve a small gift. The meal over, family members gather around the Christmas tree to sing Christmas carols and dance hand in hand around the tree. Then one of the assembled children is chosen to select the wrapped presents, that are already kept under the Christmas tree, and hand them over to the other family members - one at a time - so that everyone may have the pleasure of watching what the others got.







   Christmas Day(December 25th) is a rather quiet time and is usually a day to be spent in the company of close friends and family members. The Christmas lunch typically includes dishes consisting of cold cuts and different types of fish, along with Aquavit for the adults. Everyone wishes "Glaedelig Jul"(Merry Christmas in Danish) to each other on Christmas Day.

DIY THREE VINTAGE PAPER ORNAMENTS TO MAKE FOR THE HOLIDAYS!

   This diy comes from www.heartlandpaper.typepad.com.  This tutorial is for not just 1 ornament but three.  Good luck and happy paper folding.




All ornaments


 


We've created 3 fun ornaments for you to make with your friends and family. We hope you enjoy making them for your holiday season.
6 Pointed Star Ornament
This star is so easy to make, but has a huge wow factor! You will love how easy it is to make if you have a Scor-Pal Tool. Just mention KSL at the stores until December 15th to get 20% off a scor pal.





6 pointed star




Download 6 Pointed Star Ornament Instructions






Ribbon candy





Ribbon Candy Ornament:

Download Ribbon Candy Ornament Instructions






Vintage ball ornament




 
Vintage Ball Ornament:

Download Vintage Ball Ornament Instructions

HOW TO MAKE HOLIDAY SNOW GLOBES!

  This comes from www.marthastewart.com .  Almost anyone will enjoy making and setting these out for the holidays.




Create a Winter Wonderland in a Jar



Create a Winter Wonderland in a Jar

The shimmering magic of snowfall is always transfixing, whether it's outside your window or inside this classic toy. Homemade globes let you create a wintry scene straight out of your own imagination.

Almost any jar works for this project: Baby-food, pimiento, and olive jars are good choices. Look for plastic or ceramic figurines (metal ones are prone to rust) at flea markets and hobby or model-railroad shops. Synthetic evergreen tips are available at many floral-supply stores. You will also need oil-based enamel paint, sandpaper, epoxy, distilled water, glitter, and glycerin (available at drugstores).







 

Add Distilled Water and Glitter

If the jar lids are not in seasonal colors already, paint them with oil-based enamel paint. Sand the inside of the lid until the surface is rough. With clear-drying epoxy, adhere the figurine to the inside of the lid, and let the epoxy dry.

Fill the jar almost to the top with distilled water; add a pinch of glitter and a dash of glycerin to keep the glitter from falling too quickly. Don't add too much, or the glitter will stick to the bottom of the jar when it's flipped. Screw on the lid tightly, being careful not to dislodge the figurine. Turn the jar over and back again -- and let it snow.







 

Sleigh-Ride Snow Globe

For a more professional look, you can also assemble a snow globe using a water globe and base. With a little shake, our customized snow globe even jingles! The horse, sleigh, and pine tree are model-train-set props. The bell-harness can be made with red and black enamel paint and tiny silver beads.
 
 
 
 
 

Customize the Snow Scene with Paint

To customize the water globe, paint the base, the sleigh's interior, and the jingle harness red; glue on silver beads for bells and waxed twine for reins.
When real snow is nowhere to be found -- as is the case in many parts of the United States in December -- you can conjure up a one-horse-sleigh ride. With a little shake, our customized snow globe even jingles. The horse, sleigh, and pine tree are model-train-set props. The bell-harness was made with red and black enamel paint and tiny silver beads; the reins were made from waxed twine.
Sleigh-Ride Snow Globe
Tools and Materials
6-inch water globe with base
Sculpey modeling clay
Snowflakes
O scale horses and sleigh, legacystation.com (or use other small toys)
Paint (for base and sleigh)
Paintbrushes
Silver beads (for bells)
Waxed twine (for reins)
Aluminum foil
Drill with a 3/32-bit
Screw and washer
Silicone sealant
Ribbon and bells (optional, for base)
Note: Assembling the globe takes two days, so plan accordingly.


Snow Globe How-To

1. To customize, paint base, sleigh's interior, and jingle harness red; glue on silver beads for bells and waxed twine for reins.
2. For snowbank, shape Sculpey clay over an aluminum-foil form, making sure resulting bank fits atop gasket inside base and is visible inside globe.
3. Press tree, sleigh, and horse into clay to make indentations. Bake clay according to label. Drill a hole into center of bottom of patty with a 3/32-bit; attach to gasket with a screw and washer. Cover seams with silicone sealant. Glue figures in place with sealant. Presoak snow, fill globe with water, and seal. Tie ribbon and bells around base.

SANTA'S MAGIC KEY DIY, FOR THE LITTLE ONES IN THE FAMILY!

  This diy comes from www.pearls-handcuffs-happyhour.blogspot.com.  This was too precious to pass up.  Just think of what your little boy or girl would do if they found one of these on their door or in their stocking on Christmas morning.  Almost reminds me of the famous bell from the "Polar Express".

Santa’s Magic Key

Have y’all seen these?! I was at the cutest little shop about a month ago and they were selling “Santa’s Magic Key”. The price tag? $20!!!! {Yeah. Ummm…just incase you don’t know me well, I’m not a “pay full price” kind of person. Like, not at all. And if it’s something I think I can duplicate on my own, well then I’m all about it. }
So I headed to Hobby Lobby & picked up some vintage style skeleton keys. I found a set of 6 on a ring and they.were. PRESH. AND, they were half off so I paid $6. {That’s like $1 a key!!!} I googled “Santa’s Magic Key Poems” and there were about a gajillion that popped up, but this is the one I liked the best…
It’s the night before Christmas & we’re excited as can be.
We’re leaving this out for you…it’s a very special key.
You can shimmy down the chimney, or tiptoe through the door.
Just use this key we left for you to find cookies, milk, & more!
I created a tag, found a fun font, & typed the poem onto the tag along with a picture of the cutest little vintage Santa. I printed out the tag, cut it, and backed it onto a thick piece of textured cardstock. Then I used my mod podge to seal it together {I really like the finish better than using a glue stick :)} & used my distress ink pad to give it a vintage-y feel.
 
 
 
 
magickey
magickey2





I punched a hole in the tag & strung a little ribbon through it & attached the key. SO super easy and TOO cute {if you ask me ;)}. The boys will EAT.THIS.UP!!!!!!!




 
magickey4
magickey5 


 
Santa’s Magic Key is all ready for him & we can’t wait for him to visit!!!
Total cost of this fun little project?! A whopping $1!!!!! The keys were about $1 a piece…I had the cardstock, ink pad, & ribbon on hand, so there was no cost there! I saved $19!!
Wanna make a magic key for Santa?! Head to the nearest Hobby Lobby…pick up a set of keys…and download the tag HERE. {Leave me a comment if the link doesn’t work…I’ll be happy to send you the template!!!} Enjoy!!!!!

Monday, December 4, 2017

CHRISTMAS IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC!



 


   In the Czech Republic, preparations for Christmas begins right from around mid-November. Houses are thoroughly cleaned, carpets washed and furniture dusted. Gift shops and departmental stores are seen to be decked for the occassion. The festive spirit is apparent with buyers turning up at the stores every evening to purchase gifts, new apparels and various items of decoration. Also bought are sweets like Linzer cookies and Vanilla roll or food items such as "Vanoka", traditional Christmas loaves. These are either bought or even baked at home.
   The Advent period begins here four Sundays before Christmas Eve. During this time, a wreath is made of several evergreen branches fastened together, decorated with ribbons, pinecones and other trinkets and four candles placed around it, each representing one of the four weeks of the Advent period. Children are gifted beautiful Advent calendars to count the days to December 25. Every day they open one of the 24 small windows in it and find a small reward, usually a piece of chocolate, behind each of them.





Image result for CHRISTMAS IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC!
Some dinner foods from the Czech Republic
 
 
 
 

   A well known custom observed here is "Barborky" that is practiced on the feast day of St. Barbora. On every 4th of December, young girls of marriageable age cut off a twig from a cherry tree and put it in water. If it blooms by Christmas Eve, the girl is believed to get married sometime during the coming year.
In the final days to December 25th, gifts and greetings are sent out to friends and family members. Every individual home is decorated as beautifully as possible. The Christmas tree is indisensable to the Czech Christmas decorations. Fruits such as red apples and nuts, straw crafts and glass decorations are traditionally used to adorn these trees. Christmas trees are set up, either on December 23rd or 24th, in individual homes and even in public squares in Czech towns and cities. The Christmas tree on Prague’s Old Town Square is very popular and a tourist attraction during the season. Christmas trees,





Image result for CHRISTMAS IN THE CZECH REPUBLIC!
Some holiday treats from the Czech Republic
 
 
 
 


whether in Czech homes or public spots, are taken down usually before January 6th, the Day of Epiphany. Setting up the manger is also an important part of Czech Christmas and one of the oldest traditions here. Throughout the republic, the Nativity Scene is created in varying sizes and from various materials like wood, paper, ceramics, gingerbread and the like. The Baby Jesus, surrounded by Mary and Joseph, form the focus of the manger scene.
   The Christmas season in the Czech Republic begins with the feast and the visit of St. Nicholas or Svaty Mikalas on December 6th. The feast of St. Nicholas (or Svaty Mikalas) is enthusiastically celebrated here. During the evening of the 5th December, children watch the sky for any sign of St. Nicholas.
    Czechs believe that Svaty Mikalas climbs down to earth from the heaven using a golden rope and carrying two sacks - a sack filled with presents for good children and a sack filled with sticks for kids who behave badly throughout the year. On the eve of the feast day, December 5th, children hang a stocking in their windows to be filled by St. Nicholas at night. On St. Nicholas' day, children wake up to recieve their presents. But they get their main presents only on Christmas eve evening.








 

On Christmas Eve (December 24th) families gather at home to decorate the Christmas tree and prepare dinner. Many people, especially the devout ones, fast all day long on Christmas Eve and break it with a grand meal in the evening, when the first star emerges in the night sky. All relatives and friends are invited to the Christmas dinner. Fish soup and fried carp with potato salad form the main menu of a traditional Christmas Eve dinner. It is considered unlucky to get up from the table before everyone is finished. Also, the table is always set for an even number of guests in the belief that it would bring bad luck if done otherwise. Presents are exchanged after dinner and often, fortunes are told. At midnight, people attend Holy Mass, known as "Pasterka".
   On December 25th (Christmas Day), the churches in Czechoslovakia are adorned with evergreens and Christmas Trees. The festivities last for three days. Czechs traditionally have a cod roe soup on this day and tempt each other with tales of a mythical golden pig. Everyone wishes each other 'Prejeme Vam Vesele Vanoce' (Merry Christmas) on this day.

CHRISTMAS IN FINLAND!


Image result for christmas in finland






   In Finland, Christmas is celebrated from 24th to 26th of December. Preparations for the festival begin from approximately a month ago with many Finnish people buying the Christmas tree, decorative items and gifts and goodies for the season. Houses are cleaned and special treats like gingerbread cookies and prune tarts prepared for the oncoming festive season.  In Finland, Santa might also be known as Joulupukki!
   The first Sunday in December (also called the First Advent) starts the Finnish Christmas season. Christmas lights begin to appear in the stores along with gifts, goods and goodies for the festival. Children count the days to the festival making their own Christmas calendar with some great pictures related to the Christmas theme or even some chocolate caramel.







 

   In Finland the Christmas tree is set up on Christmas Eve. Fir trees are felled, tied onto sleds, and taken home to be decorated beautifully with candies, paper flags, cotton, tinsel, apples and other fruits. Candles are used for lighting the trees. Many women make a visit to some local sauna to groom themselves for the occassion.
   Christmas here is replete with different homegrown customs. In Finnish rural areas, it is a popular tradition for farmers to tie a sheaf of grain, nuts and seeds on a pole and placing it in the garden for the birds to feed on. Only after birds eat their dinner, the farmers partake of their Christmas dinner.






Image result for christmas in finland
 
 
 

   Christmas dinner traditionally begins in Finland with the appearance of the first star in the sky. Dinner is served between 5-7 pm, and consists usually of roasted pig or a roasted ham and vegetables. The main dish is boiled codfish, served white and fluffy, along with allspice, boiled potatoes, and cream sauce. A week ahead of the dinner, the codfish is soaked in a lye solution to soften it. Once the dinner is complete, children head straight to bed while adults chat and drink coffee until about midnight. Other important traditions of the day consist of a visit to the Christmas mass. Many Finnish families also visit cemeteries to remember the dead and have porridge for lunch. Joyful carols and local Christmas songs also form an essential part of Christmas Eve festivities.






Image result for christmas in finland
 
 
 


   On Christmas Day, church services start out early at six in the morning. Most people visit families and friends. Family get-togethers are the high point of this day. Christmas cards are being exchanged and everyone wishes another "Hyvaa Joulua", meaning "Merry Christmas" in Finnish.