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DECK THE HOLIDAY'S

Thursday, December 28, 2017

DIY WINE GLASS CHARMS!

   This diy comes from www.centsationalgirl.com .  What better way to give a gift on the New Year and it will also work to tell everyone's champagne glasses apart too. Enjoy!


DIY Wine or Champagne Glass Charms


That time of year is here again – we’ve got guests visiting from all over just about every weekend until the end of the year. With all the festivities planned over the next few months, I wanted to make some wine glass charms to help keep everyone’s glass identified during all the celebrating.
I first found out about an embossing powder called Amazing Glaze that hardens to a resin from my friend Cathe, she had used it to to make a memory pet tag and decal penny pendant in the past and I really wanted to try it out! I ordered the powder, some pendant bases and earwires, then came up with several versions of DIY wine glass charms. The first are these blingy sparklers which will work for just about any occasion.




diy wine glass charms





With the right supplies, these are so easy to make! Find some earwires, pendant bases, and some Amazing Glaze, and you’re in business (my sources below).




amazing glaze and charms





The sparkling gem versions were made with simple colorful glitter from my stash that was layered along the bottom of the pendant base, then topped with a small amount of the powder glaze (seen below).




glitter and glaze



 
Using aluminum foil beneath, I simply baked the first layer of powder inside the pendants in a 350 degree oven for two minutes and allowed it to cool for 5 minutes. Then I applied two more thin layers following the same technique, 2 minutes in a 350 degree oven until the powder melts and turns clear.
It hardens into a resin to make these little gems for your wineglass!


 

diy sparkle wine glass charms




Next, I experimented with some round numbered stickers from the scrapbook section of my local craft store to create these numbered versions. I noticed anything using paper tends to get a little muddied, and I suspect if you used a home printer to create a design on paper, the ink may bleed. But these raised numbered stickers turned out to look pretty good with two layers of the Amazing Glaze powder turned resin on top.
Before:


 

numbered stickers


After:


diy numbered wine glass charms





I had some fun making a set of holiday charms too since we always throw a big Christmas party every year. Fine white glitter mixed with the Amazing Glaze powder forms the base. They’re topped with more vellum ornament and gift stickers and given another thick coat of the Glaze, kinda cute.




christmas wine glass charms





You can even skip the charms and use beads or vintage buttons or whatever you want. For the monogram charms below, I used some leftover metal button cover kits and paired them with some clear letter stickers. I made a small hole in the top with a nail, then melted a few thin coats of the Amazing Glaze powder over them in the oven.




monogram stickers
 
 
 

Hey, a tag for all my favorite drinkers!
*hiccup*


 

diy monogram wine glass charms





No need to use this method for just wine glass tags, it works just as well for making charms for necklaces or bracelets too.




christmas charms on necklace bracelet
glitter charms on bracelet
 
 
 


Yes it’s true, the blingy glitter versions are my most fave, and I think they’d be really fab in vivid colors. I found the pendant bases at Rubber Nation and the wine glass earwires at FeatherBoutique on Etsy. Amazing Glaze is available on Amazon, $10 for 2 ounces but I have well over an ounce left over after making all these wine glass charms. I imagine you could make several dozen with one 2 ounce jar.



 

diy wine glass charms cg




 
They’re a fun and useful holiday gift idea for your friends and family so get together with your pals and make a whole bunch of them, just make sure you invite me to your craft party cause I’ll bring the wine.

 

THE CHRISTMAS TREE SHIP!


The Original Christmas Tree Ship

Captains Schuenemann




 
   The story of the beginning of the Christmas Tree Ship is the story of the Schuenemann family, and most particularly the story of Capt Herman Schuenemann and his last ship, the Rouse Simmons.
   In approximately 1885 August and his brother Herman Schuenemann moved to Chicago to seek out their fortune. Chicago’s Harbor was one of the busiest in the world at this time with over 20,000 vessels entering and leaving annually. As competition was fierce, the brothers became excellent businessmen as well as sailors. Although they made a relatively good living, two-thirds of their annual income was generated between Thanksgiving and Christmas with the sale of trees. August had become a truly competitive trader and by 1895 had a well-established reputation as a Christmas tree merchant. In early November of 1898, August was in Sturgeon Bay looking for trees that he would bring to Chicago on a ship named the S. Thal. He purchased 3,500 trees and on November 9th departed with 3 crewmembers for Chicago’s Harbor. A few days later the S. Thal was caught in a horrific storm off the coast of Glencoe, IL and perished. There were no survivors. Herman did not sail with his brother that year, probably due to the birth of his twin daughters in October.
   Continuing with the efforts of his and Augusts, Herman now had a business without a partner. Herman sailed further and further north with each passing year. This allowed him to purchase better quality trees at a lower cost but this also made Herman and his crew incur poor and unpredictable weather the further north they sailed. Over the next few years Herman had lost one ship and almost lost another. This triggered him to purchase larger ships (the largest measuring 130 feet long and 26 feet wide.) With the larger and more stable ships, Herman went as far north as the Soo Canal to purchase his trees from the Indians. Eventually, he would hire his own crew to cut and prepare the trees for the journey back to Chicago. In 1910 Schuenemann had established the ” Northern Michigan Evergreen Nursery” whose address was given as the “SW corner Clark Street Bridge.” This allowed him to lower his expenses by selling his cargo directly from the deck of his ship. No longer would Capt. Schuenemann pay laborers to carry trees to store owners and local grocers. He was trying to eliminate as much of the middleman as possible. While Herman sold trees and greens on deck, his daughters worked below by the warmth of the cabin stove making wreaths out of cut greens. In order to even further lower his expenses, sometime between 1910 and 1912 Herman purchased 240 acres in upper Michigan. In salaries for tree cutters, crew, provisions, towing fees and miscellaneous expenses, a single trip would have cost him approximately $3,000. Any failure to return with trees would leave Herman flat broke. In order for Herman to cover all of these expenses as well as make the bulk of his annual income, he now had to transport as many trees as possible with each journey.





Loaded with Trees



 

   By 1911, Schuenemann owned a large vessel named the Rouse Simmons. A ship of her magnitude could carry more than 5,000 trees that were lashed down tightly. The weight of these trees would not become a factor unless they became wet and froze. If this was to happen the weight could now become detrimental to the journey’s success. Schuenemann had the Rouse Simmons recaulked during his passage to Chicago in 1911, but failed to recaulk her prior to leaving Chicago for his 1912 adventure. The neglect to recaulk the Rouse Simmons in 1912 was probably due to financial strains caused by Schuenemann being sued for failure to repay an old debt. The decision not to recaulk the Rouse Simmons would be a fatal one. She was last seen on November 23, 1912, between Kewaunee and Two Rivers Wisconsin, with distress signals flying. Capt. Schuenemann and his crew of 16 went down just 30 miles south of his boyhood home of Ahnapee, Wisconsin. Throughout the years that the Schuenemann’s made their living from the Maritime Christmas Tree business, it rose, peaked and by 1912 was fading. What began as an informal barter system evolved into big business controlled by the high-volume wholesalers. As the railroads and improved highways were now the most efficient way of moving Christmas trees throughout the Midwest, old wooden bottomed vessels became obsolete.
   Chicagoans remembered ” Christmas Tree” Schuenemann for at least the next generation. In December of 1934, in the height of the depression, three middle-aged women opened a store on the Near North Side of Chicago. The sign, which brought back many good times and feelings, read CAPTAIN AND MRS. SCHUENEMANN’S DAUGHTERS. Passerby’s entered the store, shared stories of their childhood on the docks and bought the tree they were to display in their parlor. That was the only year that the daughters had a shop. That was probably due to the depression, but it was said that so few people had given so much joy to so many people, as did the Schuenemann family, just for doing their job.



Image result for CHRISTMAS TREE SHIP
 
 
 


   With a Christmas tree hanging from its mast and a red-bowed wreath fastened beneath its bridge, the icebreaker Mackinaw powers through the frigid waters of Lake Michigan bound for Chicago's Navy Pier. Lashed to the decks of the U.S. Coast Guard ship are 1,500 Christmas trees that will be distributed to disadvantaged families in the Windy City.
   Each December, the 240-foot Mackinaw and its 60-person crew carries on the time-honored tradition that rouses holiday spirit and creates lasting memories for tree growers, volunteers and recipients.
   "This will be our first Christmas tree," says Nana Afari, 34, after receiving a free tree last year with her husband, Eric, 36, and their son, Kweku, 3. "We're very excited about it," adds Afari, who immigrated to the United States from Ghana eight years ago.
   "We're going to put a star on the tree," Kweku chimes in.
   The Christmas Tree Ship, as the evergreen-laden Mackinaw is dubbed, continues the legacy of the Rouse Simmons, a three-masted schooner that transported Christmas trees to Chicago a century ago from Michigan's Upper Peninsula. The ship's captain, Herman Schuenemann, sold trees from his vessel and gave some to Chicagoans who couldn't afford their 50-cent price.
   "The crew and I feel fortunate to share in such a wonderful endeavor," says Mackinaw Cmdr. Scott Smith, 42, standing aboard his ship. "We're proud to stand in for the Rouse Simmons."


Reclaiming a Tradition The legacy of the Rouse Simmons was resurrected a decade ago as Coast Guard administrators and members of Chicago's marine community were searching for ways to help Chicago's less fortunate during the Christmas season. They formed the Chicago Christmas Ship Committee and began raising money to purchase trees for families who couldn't afford them.
   "We knew a large number of kids couldn't afford Christmas trees; we didn't want that to happen in Chicago," says Truitt, the committee's program director.
   Since 2000, the all-volunteer organization has given away more than 10,500 trees to poor individuals and families. "It gives me great satisfaction to know these trees are going to families who wouldn't otherwise get one," says Lloyd Karzen, 71, a yachting enthusiast who has served on the Chicago Christmas Ship Committee since its inception.
   The committee organizes thousands of volunteers each year and raises thousands of dollars to purchase Christmas trees. Growers in Michigan and Wisconsin provide 6-foot fir trees at reduced prices and deliver them to Cheboygan, Mich. (pop. 5,295), where the Mackinaw is stationed
   "Contributing to someone else's happiness is what the season's all about," says Chris Maciborski, 36, owner of Dutchman Tree Farms in Manton, Mich.






Image result for CHRISTMAS TREE SHIP
 
 
 



Voyage and volunteers
   Scouts, high school students and crew members load the Mackinaw prior to Thanksgiving before the Coast Guard cutter departs on its 600-mile seasonal journey to replace buoys on Lake Michigan with winter markers.
   After the Mackinaw docks in Chicago on the first Friday in December, yachting club volunteers string 8,000 lights on its railings, some years chipping off ice before they can decorate the ship. Hundreds of school children tour the ship, listen to ecology lessons from Coast Guard Auxiliary, and hear Ruth Gibson retell her mother's Christmastime story.
   The following day, the trees are unloaded. Laughing, joking and singing holiday songs, 250 Scouts from across the Midwest unload trees from the Mackinaw's deck. Trucks transport the evergreen cargo to 16 charities and churches throughout Chicago for distribution, and the Mackinaw departs to resume its winter mission.
   "This is a fantastic display of human togetherness," says Boy Scout Nick Bernstein, 17, a third-year volunteer. "It's truly heartwarming."

BOXING DAY!



Image result for boxing day





   Boxing Day is a bank or public holiday that occurs on December 26, or the first or second weekday after Christmas Day, depending on national or regional laws. It is observed in the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, and some other Commonwealth nations.
   In South Africa, Boxing Day was renamed Day of Goodwill in 1994. In Ireland it is recognized as St. Stephen's Day (Irish: Lá Fhéile Stiofáin) or the Day of the Wren (Irish: Lá an Dreoilín). In the Netherlands, Lithuania, Austria, Germany, Scandinavia and Poland, December 26 is celebrated as the Second Christmas Day.
   Although the same legislation – the Bank Holidays Act 1871 – originally established the bank holidays throughout the UK, the day after Christmas was defined as Boxing Day in England, Scotland and Wales, and the feast day of St. Stephen in Ireland.  A "substitute bank holiday in place of 26 December" is only possible in Northern Ireland, reflecting the legal difference in that St. Stephen's Day does not automatically shift to the Monday in the same way as Boxing Day.
   In Canada, Boxing Day takes place on December 26th and is a federal statutory holiday where all workers receive time off with pay.








 

Etymology

   The exact etymology of the term "boxing" is unclear and there are several competing theories, none of which are definitive.  The tradition has long included giving money and other gifts to those who were needy and in service positions. The European tradition has been dated to the Middle Ages, but the exact origin is unknown and there are some claims that it goes back to the late Roman/early Christian era; metal boxes placed outside churches were used to collect special offerings tied to the Feast of Saint Stephen.
In the UK, it was a custom for tradesmen to collect "Christmas boxes" of money or presents on the first weekday after Christmas as thanks for good service throughout the year.  This is mentioned in Samuel Pepys' diary entry for 19 December 1663; This custom is linked to an older English tradition: in exchange for ensuring that wealthy landowners' Christmases ran smoothly, their servants were allowed to take the 26th off to visit their families. The employers gave each servant a box containing gifts and bonuses (and sometimes leftover food).

About The Date

   Boxing Day is a secular holiday that is traditionally celebrated on 26 December, the day after Christmas Day, which is also St. Stephen's Day, a religious holiday.  However, when 26 December falls on a Sunday, Boxing Day in many places is moved to 27 December. In the U.K., where Boxing Day is a bank holiday, if Boxing Day falls on a Saturday, a substitute bank holiday is given on the following Monday, but if Boxing Day falls on a Sunday – which means that Christmas Day, another bank holiday, fell on a Saturday – then the Statutory Holiday for Christmas is moved to Monday 27 December and the Statutory Holiday for Boxing Day is moved to Tuesday 28 December.




Image result for boxing day
 
 
 
 
 
   In Scotland, Boxing Day has been specified as an additional bank holiday since 1974, by Royal Proclamation under the Banking and Financial Dealings Act 1971.
In Ireland – when it was part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland – the Bank Holidays Act 1871 established the feast day of St. Stephen as a non-movable public holiday on 26 December. Since the Irish War of Independence, the name 'Boxing Day' is used only by the authorities in Northern Ireland, which remains part of the UK. There, Boxing Day is a movable public holiday in line with the rest of the UK.
In the Australian state of South Australia, 26 December is a public holiday known as Proclamation Day and Boxing Day is not normally a public holiday.
   In some Canadian provinces, Boxing Day is a statutory holiday  that is always celebrated on 26 December. In Canadian provinces where Boxing Day is a statutory holiday, and it falls on a Saturday or Sunday, compensation days are given in the following week.

Shopping

   In Britain,  Canada,  New Zealand and some states of Australia, Boxing Day is primarily known as a shopping holiday, much like the day after Thanksgiving in the United States. It is a time where shops have sales, often with dramatic price reductions. For many merchants, Boxing Day has become the day of the year with the greatest revenue. In the UK in 2009 it was estimated that up to 12 million shoppers appeared at the sales (a rise of almost 20% compared to 2008, although this was also affected by the fact that the VAT would revert to 17.5% from 1 January).




Image result for boxing day
 
 
 


   Many retailers open very early (typically 5 am or even earlier) and offer doorbuster deals and loss leaders to draw people to their stores. It is not uncommon for long queues to form early in the morning of 26 December, hours before the opening of shops holding the big sales, especially at big-box consumer electronics retailers.  Many stores have a limited quantity of big draw or deeply discounted items.  Because of the shoulder-to-shoulder crowds, many choose to stay home and avoid the hectic shopping experience. The local media often cover the event, mentioning how early the shoppers began queueing up, providing video of shoppers queueing and later leaving with their purchased items.  The Boxing Day sales have the potential for customer stampedes, injuries and even fatalities.  As a result, many retailers have implemented practices aimed at managing large numbers of shoppers. They may limit entrances, restrict the number of patrons in a store at a time, provide tickets to people at the head of the queue to guarantee them a hot ticket item or canvass queued-up shoppers to inform them of inventory limitations.
   In recent years, retailers have expanded deals to "Boxing Week", and some stores even have "half way to boxing day sales" on June 26th While Boxing Day is 26 December, many retailers who hold Boxing Day Sales will run the sales for several days before or after 26 December, often up to New Year's Eve. Notably, in the recession of late 2008, a record number of retailers were holding early promotions due to a weak economy. Canada's Boxing Day has often been compared with the American Super Saturday, the Saturday before Christmas.




Image result for boxing day
 
 
 
 

   In some areas of Canada, particularly in Atlantic Canada and parts of Northern Ontario (including Sault Ste. Marie), most retailers are prohibited from opening on Boxing Day, either by provincial law or municipal bylaw. In these areas, sales otherwise scheduled for 26 December are moved to the 27th.
   In Ireland, since 1902, most stores remain closed on St. Stephen's Day, as with Christmas Day. In 2009, some stores decided to open on this day, breaking a 107-year-old tradition. Some stores have also started their January sales on this day.

 Cyber Boxing Day


   The online version of Boxing Day has been referred to as "Cyber Boxing Day". In the UK in 2008, Boxing Day was the busiest online shopping day of the year.  In 2009, many retailers with both online and High Street stores launched their online sales on Christmas Eve and their High Street sales on Boxing Day.



File:Keswick Boxing Day hunt 1962.jpg


Sport

   In England, Scotland and Northern Ireland it is traditional for the Premier League, Scottish Premier League and Irish Premier League respectively, as well as the lower divisions and Rugby leagues, to hold a full programme of football and Rugby League matches on Boxing Day. Traditionally, matches on Boxing Day are played against local rivals. This was originally to avoid teams and their fans having to travel a long distance to an away game on the day after Christmas Day. It also makes the day an important one in the sporting calendar. In Australia and South Africa, on the boxing day famous and awaited test matches are played. Especially in Australia nearly 100,000 people come every year to the Melbourne Cricket Ground to witness the Boxing Day test match.
   In horse racing, there is the King George VI Chase at Kempton Park Racecourse in Surrey. It is the second most prestigious chase in England, after the Cheltenham Gold Cup.
   Boxing Day is a popular day in the U.K. and U.S. for mounted fox hunters. Despite fox hunting being banned by the Hunting Act in 2004, Boxing Day remains the biggest hunt of the year for most hunts in the UK by use of scent drag trails instead of live quarry.
Australia holds the first day of the Boxing Day Test in Melbourne at the Melbourne Cricket Ground and the start to the Sydney to Hobart Yacht Race.
   The IIHF World U20 Championship (ice hockey) typically begins on 26 December.
The NHL tends to have close to a full slate of games (11 were played in 2010), following the league-wide days off given for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day.
   The Spengler Cup (ice hockey) also begins on 26 December in Davos, Switzerland, and includes HC Davos, Team Canada, and other top European Hockey teams.
In some African Commonwealth nations, particularly Ghana, Uganda, Malawi, Zambia and Tanzania, prize fighting contests are held on Boxing Day. This practice has also been followed for decades in Guyana and Italy.

 


 

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

DIY MAGNETIC HOLIDAY ADVENT CALENDAR!

This diy comes from www.twigandthistle.com.  Make this ahead of the Christmas season and your children will enjoy finding what little treasures and candies lie beneath the lids of the holiday tin advent calendar.

Magnetic Holiday Advent Calendar DIY

  





 
UPDATE: Wow, and I thought I was being so clever, Martha beat me to it by a whole year! Check out her version!
The long Thanksgiving holiday is the perfect opportunity to get started on some of those Christmas crafts you’ve got planned. I started a little early this year so that I could share this little project with you and I hope you enjoy.
Some of my fondest holiday memories from childhood were around the advent calendar. My grandfather would mail us one every year and I can remember how excited we were every day to open the tiny doors to see the surprise inside! Typically chocolate but sometimes a small trinket or toy.
This project is a new take on the traditional advent calendar and one that will easily last for years. With just a few basic supplies, theses metal storage tins transform into a fun holiday count down. Cheers!







 
MATERIALS

• 25 Small 41 mm Metal Tins with Glass Tops
Available through Packaging Specialties order by phone at 206.762.0540
and online at Polymer Clay Express
• Advent Calendar Downloadable PDF (See Below)
• Magnetic Sheets (Available at Office Supply Stores)
• Craft Glue or Strong Double-Sided Tape
• X-Acto Knife
• Bone Folder
• 1 4/8″ Craft Punch (Optional)

INSTRUCTIONS

1. Begin by downloading and printing the Advent Calendar PDF. With an x-acto knife, trim out along black lines. Once circles are trimmed, cut inwards making small slits along outer rim. Be sure to cut only to the edge of the color. This will aid in fitting the rounds inside the lids.
2. With the inside of the lid facing up, place number on top, face down and press into place. Secure by rubbing the pointy end along the inside edge of the tin top.
3. To make them magnetic, cut circular shape slightly smaller than the tin from magnetic sheeting. This can be done with either a craft punch or x-acto knife. Glue to bottom of tin, making sure not to glue magnetic side (the dark side).
4. Fill tins with small candies, toys, cute paper clips, whatever will fit and your family will enjoy!
5. Arrange magnets on fridge or any other magnetic surface. Place in rectangular numerical order, in the shape of a tree, or arrange them randomly for added hunting fun. The possibilities are endless so have fun!




 

CHRISTMAS IN THE DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF THE CONGO!




 

   Christmas in the Democratic Republic of the Congo is more of a religious festival than being commercial. Most people won't have any presents.
   Christmas Eve is very important with Churches having big musical evenings (most churches have at least 5 or 6 choirs) and a nativity play. These plays last a very long time. They start at the beginning of the evening with the creation and the Garden of Eden and end with the story of King Herod killing the baby boys.
   People taking part in the play really like to show off their 'best' acting skills and tend to go over the top and 'ham it up'! King Herod and the soldiers are often figures of fun (like pantomime 'baddies') and Mary is often well advanced in labour before she arrives!







 

   The birth of Jesus is timed to happen as close to midnight as possible and after that come the shepherds, the wise men and the slaughter of the innocents. This means the play normally finishes about 1am. However, in some places there will be further singing until dawn! The Christmas day service then starts at 9am with lots more singing.
   On Christmas day, most families try to have a better meal than usual. If they can afford it, they will have some meat (normally chicken or pork). The rest of the day is spent quite quietly, maybe sleeping after a busy and late night on Christmas Eve!
People go back to work on the 26th (Boxing Day).
In the Lingala language, which is spoken in the DRC and some other African countries, Happy/Merry Christmas is 'Mbotama Malamu'.

4 DIY CHRISTMAS STOCKING IDEAS TO MAKE!

This diy come from www.writefromkaren.com .  These would make great childrens stockings.  After they are sewn together, let them decorate them to the childs liking.  Good luck!

Here are some fun and cute stocking ideas.
In fact, wouldn’t these be fun to scale down and put on packages? OR, maybe you know a child who has a birthday around Christmas? You could scale them down and make cute little goodie bags, er, stockings to take home.


Fancy Boot Stocking



fancyboot

This boot was made for stuffing, and that’s just what Santa will do this Christmas Eve.

CRAFT MATERIALS:


Scissors
2 pieces of purple felt, each 24 by 15 inches
2 pieces of black faux fur, each 24 by 15 inches
Long sewing pins
Large-eye sewing needle
Purple embroidery floss
Costume jewelry buttons and chains (sold at many fabric stores)
Clear tape
9 inches of black twist cord
Time needed: About 2 to 3 Hours
1. The Basic Stocking: Click here to download the fancy boot stocking pattern.
2. Cut 1 boot shape from each piece of the purple felt and 1 from each piece of the black fur. Be sure to cut the fur boots so the toes point in opposite directions with the fur sides up.
3. Pin together the boots with the fur boots on the inside, furry sides in, and the purple boots on the outside.
4. Using the floss, whipstitch around the edges, sewing the boots together. Leave the top edges unsewn.
5. At the top, sew together the front 2 edges, then the back 2.
6. Fold down the top to make a cuff.
7. The Trimmings: Use floss to sew the buttons and chains to the boot.
8. Tape the ends of the cord to keep them from fraying, then sew the cord to the stocking for hanging.


Elf Boot Stocking




elfstocking

Here’s a whimsical stocking in honor of Santa’s hardworking helpers.

CRAFT MATERIALS:


Scissors
2 pieces of light green fleece, each 24 by 20 inches
3 pieces of dark green felt, each 24 by 20 inches
Long sewing pins
Large-eye sewing needle
Dark green embroidery floss
Red jingle bells, 4 medium and 1 large
Clear tape
9 inches of red twist cord
Fiberfill
Time needed: About 2 to 3 Hours
1. The Basic Stocking: Click here to download the elf boot stocking pattern.
2. Cut 1 boot shape from each piece of the light green fleece
3. Cut a decorative shape from 1 piece of the dark green felt for the front of the stocking and 1 stocking shape from each of the remaining 2 pieces of the felt.
4. Place a light green boot on top of a dark green boot, pin the decorative shape on top, and use the floss to whipstitch (see page 131) around the inner edge of decorative shape through both boots.
5. Pin together all 4 boots with the dark green boots on the inside.
6. Using the floss, whipstitch around the edges, sewing the boots together. Leave the top edges unsewn.
7. At the top, sew together the front 2 edges, then the back 2.
8. Fold down the top to make a cuff.
9. The trimmings: Use the floss to sew the medium red bells to the decorative shape and the large red bell to the toe tip.
10. Tape the ends of the cord to keep them from fraying, then sew the cord to the stocking for hanging.
11. Stuff the curly toe of the boot with fiberfill to keep it from flopping over when the stocking is empty.


Bare Foot Stocking



barefoot



 

Add a touch of color to the season with this stocking that celebrates every kid’s favorite footwear — none!

CRAFT MATERIALS:

Scissors
4 pieces of gold felt, each 21 by 20 inches
Red felt and red embroidery floss
Green felt and green embroidery floss
Purple felt and purple embroidery floss
Long sewing pins
Large-eye sewing needle
Gold embroidery floss
Pony beads
Clear tape
9 inches of red twist cord
Time needed: About 2 to 3 Hours
1. The Basic Stocking: Click here to download the bare foot stocking pattern.
2. Cut 1 bare foot shape from each piece of the gold felt .
3. Cut 5 circles from the colored felts for the toenails.
4. Place one foot on top of another and pin the toenails in place.
5. Using the matching floss, whipstitch (see page 131) around the edges of each toenail, sewing through both feet.
6. Pin all 4 feet together and use the gold floss to whipstitch around the edges, sewing the feet together. Leave the top edges unsewn.
7. At the top, sew together the front 2 edges, then the back 2.
8. Fold down the top to make a cuff.
9. The Trimmings: Thread pony beads onto a 24-inch piece of colored floss, wrap it around the ankle, and tie together the ends.
10. Tape the ends of the cord to keep it from fraying, then sew it to the stocking for hanging.

Ballet Slipper Stocking



balletslipper



 

“Nutcracker” nuts, for one, will dance with joy over this dainty stocking.

CRAFT MATERIALS:


Scissors
2 pieces of white felt, each 24 by 12 inches
3 pieces of pink felt, each 24 by 16 inches
Long sewing pins
Large-eye sewing needle
Pink embroidery floss
White embroidery floss
2 ½ yards of 7/8 -inch pink ribbon
Clear tape
9 inches of white twist cord
Time needed: About 2 to 3 Hours
1. The basic stocking: Click here to download the ballet slipper stocking pattern.
2. Cut 1 stocking shape from each piece of the white felt.
3. Cut 2 shoe shapes from 1 piece of the pink felt and 1 stocking shape from each of the remaining 2 pieces of pink felt.
4. Lay out the pink stockings, toes pointing in opposite directions, with a white stocking on top of each one.
5. Pin a pink shoe on top of each white stocking.
Stitch diagram 6. Using the pink floss, whipstitch (see page 131) along the inner edge of each shoe, sewing through the pink and the white felt. Leave the outside edges unsewn.
7. Pin together the stockings so the shoes are on the outside, then whipstitch together the layers using the white floss along the white edges of the stocking and the pink floss for the shoes. Leave the top unsewn.
8. At the top, sew together the front 2 edges, then the back 2, with the white floss.
9. The Trimmings: Cut the ribbon in half, tie it in a bow, and then sew the knot to the stocking.
10. Crisscross the loose ribbon down and around the leg of the stocking and tack the ends flush to the top of the heel.
11. Tape the ends of the cord to keep them from fraying, then sew the cord to the stocking for hanging.

Tips:

A Stitch for All Stockings
Thread your needle with a length of floss and knot one end. Begin sewing by pushing the needle up through the underside of the fabric and then out the top. Loop the needle back under the fabric and repeat the stitch.

DIY MUSIC SHEET STARS!

This diy comes from www.zakkalife.blogspot.com .  Enjoy!

 

Craft: Music Sheet Stars

 
 
 
 
 
 
I was looking through the new Pottery Barn (PB) catalog when I stumbled upon something that looked very familiar, paper stars. And they weren't just any paper stars but over sized lucky stars. Did anyone else catch that? Every year PB comes out with something to fill their vases and apothecary jars. This year one of the fillers was over-sized lucky stars.

Some of you might remember I wrote a tutorial for basic lucky stars long ago, here. So, I'm resurrecting the tutorial along with an explanation on how to make these music sheet stars. For the most part the process is the same but there are a few adjustments.

Supplies:
Music sheets - search online to find holiday carols and print on light brown paper. Position your sheet music so it's formatted in landscape.
Paper trimmer or scissors
Double stick tape

Basic Star Instructions






Instructions For Large Stars

1. Cut music sheets into (2" x 11") strips. Make four strips. Tape together to make one long strip.

2. Fold star (instructions above) up to step seven. Using double stick tape, tape end down to star. Finish with step eight. Done

*I recommend not wrapping the paper too tight. The large stars are a little tricky to puff up and might require a couple tries.









Instructions for Small Stars

1. Cut music sheets into (1" x 11") strips. Make two strips. Tape together to make one long strip.

2. Fold star (instructions above) up to step seven. Using double stick tape, tape end down to star. Finish with step eight. Done




 
 
 
Other option - use wrapping paper to make the stars. You will be able to make them just about any size that you want, due to the width and length of the paper.